Virginia Tech Engineer

Features

      • A drone hovers in the air above tall corn stalks.
      • The future of farming

        Spurred by a graying workforce, Virginia Tech researchers are laying the groundwork for an accessible future of agriculture.

      • Jonathan Boreyko and Brook Kennedy with the fog harp
      • Out of the lab, into the field

        While traditional fog harvesters use mesh netting to catch these droplets, the fog harp opts for a vertical array of wires instead, a design change that increases their collection capacity for clean water by threefold.

      • What's next for Holden Hall

        With a green building certification of LEED silver, the renovated and expanded Holden Hall will allow two departments to recruit the best faculty and students and further build upon their rich shared history through the processes of extraction to purification.

Ignite

people + news

Impact

research + innovation

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      • What do bubbles, cells, and dancers have in common?

        Virginia Tech engineers have teamed up with a choreographer for a radical, creative approach to visualizing microscopic acoustic phenomena. The goal? Developing technologies that could lead to more effective treatments for cancer and other diseases.

      • An illustration of a snake wrapping around an email inbox screen on a computer.
      • Phishing for information

        An assistant professor of computer science is helping to thwart increasingly dangerous email phishing attacks.

      • Shaking up a lab

        Alumni are helping Virginia Tech establish a lab that aims to be a leading international vibrations research lab.

Inspire

alumni + giving

      • Two men pose in front of solar panels in a field.
      • The transformers

        Within a week of becoming friends, alumni Rob Wallace and Walter Barnes were making plans on future entrepreneurial ventures. Fifteen years later, they’re realizing the vision with a unique project in the clean energy sector.

      • Paige Kassalen posing in a hanger in front of the Google Solar Impulse plane.
      • Full speed ahead

        From planes to cars, there’s no stopping 25 year-old alumna Paige Kassalen, who made history with the world’s first solar-powered flight.