Gregory Young appointed associate professor in the Kevin T. Crofton Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering

Gregory Young
Gregory Young

Gregory Young has been appointed associate professor in the Kevin T. Crofton Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech.

Young’s research covers air-breathing and rocket propulsion, combustion, combustion of solid propellants, interior ballistics of rocket motors, combustion diagnostics. With his appointment, the department will expand its focus on rocket propulsion and complement the research being conducted on airbreathing propulsion. In contrast to a rocket engine, an air-breathing propulsion system uses the surrounding air to oxidize the liquid fuel.

Prior to his appointment at Virginia Tech, Young served at the Naval Surface Warfare Center at Indian Head, Maryland from 2001-19. There he held positions such as a mechanical engineer, research scientist, senior propellant expert, and most recently senior technology leader for combustion. He also served as an advisor consultant and lecturer for the University of Maryland.

Young has been recognized for his work at Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head with awards such as the On-The-Spot Award for “Completing ballistics performance calculations and interpretation of data for efforts to develop ammonium perchlorate replacements in rocket motor propellants” in 2003, the Roger M. Smith Team Award in 2004, the Robert B. Dashiell Award for Excellence in 2011, and the Dr. Delores M. Etter Scientist and Engineer of the Year Award in 2015.

Young currently serves as an executive committee member for International Symposium on Special Topics in Chemical Propulsion; as a committee member for the Joint Army Navy NASA Air Force’s Solid Propellant Burning Rate Workshop; and previously served as a session chair for the Joint Army Navy NASA Air Force’s 64th Propulsion meeting and the AIAA’s 47th Aerospace Sciences meeting.

Young obtained a bachelors and masters degrees in mechanical engineering from Pennsylvania State University in 1999 and 2001, respectively. He completed his doctoral degree in mechanical engineering in 2007 from the University of Maryland.